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Happy 244th Birthday, U.S. Navy!

Expeditionary Strike Group 3 Conducts Change of Command Ceremony

Expeditionary Strike Group 3 Conducts Change of Command Ceremony

Article Shared from DVIDS

SAN DIEGO, CA, UNITED STATES
09.30.2019
Courtesy Story
USS Makin Island (LHD 8)

SAN DIEGO – Rear Adm. John E. Gumbleton assumed command from Rear Adm. Cedric E. Pringle as Commander, Expeditionary Strike Group 3 (ESG 3) during a change of command ceremony held aboard amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8) Sep. 30.

Pringle assumed command of ESG-3 in December 2017, and upon his departure will be assigned as the 31st Commandant of the National War College.

Lt. Gen. Joseph L. Osterman, I Marine Expeditionary Force commanding general, served as the guest speaker for the event. Vice Adm. Scott D. Conn, commander, U.S. Third Fleet, presented Pringle with a Legion of Merit as an end of tour award, recognizing him for his exceptional service to the U.S. Navy.

“Here is a leader who has had incredible foresight with where we need to go as a naval service,” said Osterman. “He’s truly a selfless professional.”

As ESG-3 commander, Pringle prepared amphibious units for operations within U.S. 3rd Fleet and Amphibious Ready Group (ARG)/Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) deployments worldwide.

Pringle oversaw the USS America (LHA 6), USS Essex (LHD 2) and USS Boxer (LHD 4) ARG/MEU successful deployments to the U.S. 5th, 6th and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. Following this, he assisted in the homeport change planning for USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), USS Wasp (LHD 1), USS America (LHA 6) and USS New Orleans (LPD 18).

As Littoral Combat Force 36 deputy commander during Exercise Pacific Blitz 2018, he seamlessly integrated blue and green forces in the first exercise of its kind. Implementing advanced warfighting concepts, he exercised Littoral Operations in a Contested Environment and Expeditionary Advanced Base Operations.

Pringle’s initiatives during his tenure in command to improve warfighting readiness changed the way future strike groups will train and operate, which will deliver the most capable ships to geographic combatant commanders.

He reflected on his time as commander, while thanking his peers and the men and women of the ESG-3.

“Our Navy is still the most powerful force on the face of this earth and it doesn’t matter if we have 280 warships or 355 ships,” said Pringle, “We are still that impenetrable force. No one else in the world can do what we can do.”

Gumbleton is a native of Falmouth, Massachusetts, and was designated a naval aviator in October 1990.

At sea, Gumbleton served as commanding officer of USS Boxer (LHD 4) and most recently served as the deputy chief of strategy, resources, and plans (N5) at U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa-U.S. 6th Fleet, based in Naples, Italy.

“To win without fighting means that deterrence and diplomacy can only work under the shadow of a strong Navy and Marine Corps team,” said Gumbleton. “Our energies will be focused on the planning and testing of innovative concepts to further the intellectual work brought forward, balanced with setting the bar for credible, combat forces to be ready when the nation calls.”

ESG-3 is comprised of four amphibious squadrons, eight naval support elements and 15 amphibious warships comprised of approximately 15,000 active-duty and reserve Sailors and Marines. The mission of ESG-3 is to serve as the command element for Marine expeditionary-brigade level expeditionary operations as commander of an amphibious task force.

Click photo to expand snapshot of event.

THURSDAY TIDINGS: NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

THURSDAY TIDINGS: NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

Introduction By NHF Executive Director, Rear Admiral Sonny Masso, USN (Ret.)

Thursday Tidings this week focuses on National Hispanic Heritage Month which is a great time to reflect on our Navy’s rich Hispanic Heritage and the many accomplishments they have made in making our Navy the best in the world. Major League Baseball last night honored the career of Roberto Clemente as part of their Hispanic Heritage and appreciation. Some of the persons we will feature are the Navy equivalent. Service over self. Sacrifice. Going to any lengths to accomplish a mission. Ethics. Integrity.  READ FULL NEWSLETTER

World Maritime Day: Empowering Women

World Maritime Day: Empowering Women

BY THE MARITIME EXECUTIVE 2019-09-25 19:11:34

September 26 is World Maritime Day, and it is being celebrated this year under the theme “Empowering Women in the Maritime Community.”

“Gender equality has been recognized as one of the key platforms on which people can build a sustainable future. It is one of the 17 goals that underpin the UN’s Sustainable Development Agenda, which countries all over the world have pledged to implement,” said IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim.  READ ARTICLE

Hispanic Heritage Month – Sep 15 – Oct 15

Hispanic Heritage Month – Sep 15 – Oct 15

By: Yonca Poyraz-Dogan, Navy Office of Information Public Affairs

WASHINGTON (NNS) — The Navy observes National Hispanic Heritage Month, Sept. 15-Oct. 15, highlighting the histories and accomplishments of Americans from Spanish-speaking areas.

This year’s theme is “Hispanics: A History of Serving Our Nation.”

As of June 2018, approximately 59,000 active and Reserve Sailors of Hispanic heritage serve in the U.S. Navy contributing to the strength of the nation’s force. Hispanic Americans’ military service dates back to the Civil War.

One well-known example is Jorge Farragut who was born on the Spanish island of Minorca and joined the South Carolina Navy in 1779. Remembered as one of the first Hispanic Revolutionary War heroes, he was instrumental in securing a Union victory in New Orleans on April 28, 1862. When Adm. Farragut died in 1870, President Ulysses S. Grant led 10,000 Soldiers and Sailors through the streets of New York during his funeral procession.

READ MORE…

THURSDAY TIDINGS: NATIONAL HISPANIC HERITAGE MONTH

Naval Historical Foundation Feature – VADM Samuel L. Gravely, Jr.

Article Featured in Thursday Tidings – Naval Historical Foundation|http://www.navyhistory.org/

Foreword by Rear Admiral Sinclair Harris, President of the National Naval Officers Association (NNOA) and Naval Historical Foundation Life Member

Since I was a young boy reading Ebony Magazine’s 100 most influential Black Americans, I have admired Vice Admiral Samuel L. Gravely. He was the only Navy Officers I recall seeing in the annual edition and I held him in awe. Who knew that one day I would have the honor of actually meeting him and his incredible wife Alma. The opportunity came for LCDR Sinclair and Cora Harris to meet this legendary couple at the annual Washington DC NNOA Ester Boone Scholarship Award banquet. Not only was I able to sit with The Admiral and Alma, I was given the privilege to pick them up and take them home. While this may seem a small thing, how often does someone get to spend quality time with their hero? The first person of color in the long and glorious history of the world’s greatest navy to do so much. The first African American in the U.S. Navy to serve aboard a fighting ship as an officer, the first to command a Navy ship, the first fleet commander, and the first to become a flag officer. On the ride back to his home in Haymarket, Virginia he remarked that it had been sometime since he road in a Jeep. Needless to say, I jumped at the chance to get more time with him and his wife, so Cora and I took them on a drive one weekend around Haymarket, Leesburg and other parts of Virginia. We talked about a great number of things. I was taken by much of what they shared, but most of all by the humility that came out in their demeanor.

He talked about his family, his church and his Sailors, but not about himself. In fact, I believe it took many people to convince him to have his autobiography written because he did not take on airs. When I was asked to be one of his pall bearers, I could not have been more humbled and honored. What strikes me to this day was that he asked to be buried in a suit and not his uniform. Alma told us, “Sammy said I was a man of war, now that I am retired I am a man of peace”. Humble to the end. In my office, I keep a portrait that was given to me of Vice Admiral Gravely. It reminds me to keep calm, keep focused, and most of all to keep humble. His portrait continues to inspire me to do my best.

Click the thumbnail above to watch the retirement ceremony of Vice Admiral Samuel Gravely on July 31, 1980.

Admiral Gravely left the Navy a better, more inclusive, more diverse, and more efficient fighting force.

Watch Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Thomas B. Hayward, make his remarks in the video above beginning at the eleven-minute mark.

RADM Harris

Photo of RADM Sinclair Harris and Commander Alysa Ambrose as she was headed to Command of USS Samuel L. Gravely (DDG 107) taken in his office while RADM Harris served as Commander, US Fourth Fleet.